A Kentucky protest against slavery
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A Kentucky protest against slavery slavery inconsistent with justice and good policy : proved by a speech, delivered in the convention, held at Danville, Kentucky by Rice, David

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Published by Printed by Samuel Wood : published at the office of the Rebellion Record in New-York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Slavery -- United States.,
  • Slavery -- Kentucky.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesSlavery inconsistent with justice and good policy.
Statementby David Rice.
SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 26617.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination13 p.
Number of Pages13
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17713161M

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A Kentucky Protest Against Slavery: Slavery Inconsistent with Justice and by David Rice, Andrew Dickson White. Share your thoughts Complete your review. Tell readers what you thought by rating and reviewing this book. Rate it * You Rated it *. The history of slavery in Kentucky dates from the earliest permanent European settlements in the state, until the end of the Civil ky was classified as the Upper South or a Border state, and enslaved African Americans represented up to 25% of the population before the Civil War, concentrated in the cities of Louisville and Lexington, both in the fertile Bluegrass Region, a . used books, rare books and new books More editions of A Kentucky protest against slavery: A Kentucky protest against slavery: ISBN () Find and compare hundreds of millions of new books, used books, rare books and out of print books from over , booksellers and 60+ websites worldwide. Based on extensive research, The Antislavery Movement in Kentucky focuses on two main antislavery movements that emerged in Kentucky during the early years of opposition. By , Kentuckians such as Cassius Clay called for the emancipation of slaves -- a gradual end to slavery with compensation to by:

Get this from a library! A Kentucky protest against slavery: slavery inconsistent with justice and good policy: proved by a speech, delivered in the convention, held . This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world’s books discoverable online. A Kentucky protest against slavery Author. The Germantown Quaker Petition Against Slavery was the first protest against African-American slavery made by a religious body in the English s Daniel Pastorius authored the petition; he and three other Quakers living in Germantown, Pennsylvania (now part of Philadelphia) signed it on behalf of the Germantown Meeting of the Religious Society of Location: Haverford College Quaker and Special . This item is included in this Collection with permission from Paul Willis, Director of Libraries, William T. Young Library, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, The millionth book. [Lexington, Ky.]

The Kentucky Oral History Commission, a division of the Kentucky Historical Society, started the Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky Oral History Project in to capture stories from the civil rights era. Dr. Betsy Brinson, project director for the commission, and Dr. Tracy K’Meyer of the University of Louisville have conducted and taped. Based on extensive research, The Antislavery Movement in Kentucky focuses on two main antislavery movements that emerged in Kentucky during the early years of opposition. By , Kentuckians such as Cassius Clay called for the emancipation of slaves―a gradual end to slavery with compensation to by: ↑ Top. Resources for Teachers and Students. Kentucky’s Underground Railroad—Passage to Freedom fills in a missing piece of Kentucky history and supports inquiry in a variety of subject areas. Teachers in grades can use the minute program to illustrate Kentucky’s role in the story of slavery, abolitionism, and the Underground Railroad. The Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions were political statements drafted in and , in which the Kentucky and Virginia legislatures took the position that the federal Alien and Sedition Acts were unconstitutional. The resolutions argued that the states had the right and the duty to declare as unconstitutional those acts of Congress that were not authorized by the Constitution.